The FBook

Posts Tagged ‘management’

It’s All About Principle and Method

In consulting, Discussables, nonprofit organizations, strategic planning on February 13, 2014 at 3:59 pm

Clients come to Harvest Development Group with a variety of challenges facing their nonprofit organizations, but the underlying reason they need our help boils down to two simple aspects of their operations —  Principle and Method.

Principle and Method are the key elements of our work. The principles and methods may differ from organization to organization, but both are required to reach successful outcomes. Let’s put this into simple terms and examine the principle and method for getting dressed in the morning.

A Principle is a fundamental truth or proposition that serves as the foundation for a system of belief or behavior or for a chain of reasoning. Principles are established through trial, error, and observation. There are some common principles in getting dressed: one has to believe and agree that being dressed is important. An article of clothing is required to be classified as being dressed. To be accessible, the garment needs a place to reside when it’s not on our body. The garment also needs to be the right size and shape to fit our body. Finally, we need to be trained to assemble and secure the garment, learning techniques like buttoning, zippering and tying.

A Method is a particular form of procedure for accomplishing or approaching something;  a simple or detailed organized plan, sufficient to achieve successful outcomes. Some methods are “proven” meaning they have a good track record of success. Others are groundbreaking and innovative. There are many methods one can apply to getting dressed, each one personalized to our desired outcome. I used to watch my children get dressed — one putting one leg at a time into his pants and the other putting both legs into the pants before pulling them up. Each served their own purpose and both reached the successful outcome of wearing their pants. Efficiency and personal preference seemed to drive their actions.

The same concept of Principles and Methods can be applied to the business operations of a nonprofit organization. There are established, researched, well defined principles in program development, board development, philanthropy, recruitment and staffing. There are individualized methods that have been proven to work, and others that are innovative, which are applied to each as well.

When nonprofits contact Harvest Development Group for help, we assess to gauge what is at the root of the problem. With this information in mind, we teach the organization to apply the principles that lend support to these problems, and develop and apply the methods necessary to deliver on the outcomes they desire. So, as you can see, it all boils down to two simple aspects of your operation — Principles and Methods.

Nonprofit work is all about the money

In Rants on August 13, 2012 at 5:33 pm

I was lacking motivation for this weeks blog post, as I tapped away on my keyboard under the weight of research reports, feasibility interviews, resume reviews, re-branding our website, launching the tech start up Donorfull….. I needed something to fire me up.

And then it hit me.

I’m reading idealist.org’s latest report on jobs. According to their recent Job Seeker Report for 2012 , 68% percent of nonprofits are seeking Program staff while only 36% of nonprofits are seeking Fundraising staff.

And there it was. Really? Program staff gain twice as much height on the needs scale for nonprofits filling positions as fundraisers? So explains the current financial state of the nonprofit sector.

When fundraising is relegated to the nice to have, but first focus is that we help people position within the organization and not the ‘essential revenue stream for our ongoing survival and growth, show me the MONEY!‘ position it should be, then the whistle you hear is not the finish line of success, but the train of demolition.

Now, possibly, it could be that the nonprofits who were interviewed as part of this study, are fully booked and have the BEST fundraising teams imaginable. Maybe their philanthropic coffers are over-flowing and they have to turn donors away to sister organizations down the road, just because they don’t want to eat all the cookies.

Possible, but unlikely.

In our experience, the number one issue we hear from our clients is “we need good fundraising staff and we need more of them”!

And I have to imagine that our clients are not the only ones. I always respond the same. Fire More, Hire More.

It’s a simple equation, that moves you beyond the agony of wrestling with under-performing, poorly experienced or overworked development people.

So my question is, how long do you suffer, doing the same thing, operating the same way, before you see the light? What has to happen to bring the solution to focus- that better and more fundraisers equals more money equals more programs and clients served?

Innovate your organization by flipping your staffing on its head. Hire more fundraisers than program staff and email me the results. I want to know.

Innovation as a Culture…..

In change management, Discussables, Random, Retail ideas on August 3, 2012 at 12:31 pm
It all started with a statistic in 2006, repeated in 2011: Two thirds of all executive directors of US nonprofits intend to retire by 2016 (Cornelius, Moyers, & Bell, 2011).

That led to a thought: Filling those positions are Gen X and Y, who work so very differently and embrace a culture of Innovation

That led to a fear: Is our industry prepared?

That lead to a revelation: We need to focus hard on developing Innovative Cultures now, in order to weather the shift.

Innovate: Verb

1: to introduce as, or as if, new
2: to effect a change in 
Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 2012
 

Innovation is the creation of better or more effective products, processes, services, technologies, or ideas that are accepted by markets, governments, and society. Innovation builds on existing ideas. It is not to be confused with Invention. The Printing Press was Invented, the Kindle was Innovative.

If our Grandparents were Inventors, then Gen X/Y are Innovators. They may not own the market on Innovation, but lead the charge and drive the process. Their Innovative spirit causes them to see work differently, and for those working in the Nonprofit Sector, and stepping into the vacuum of leadership soon to be created, that could be a challenge.

The exiting generation of Boomers tend to believe work was for life and WAS life. After all, they created the ‘workaholic’ and ‘superwoman’ concepts. The Gen X/Y to come, view work and their work life much differently. They are traditionally seen as individualistic, self-reliant and skeptical of authority. They expect great workplace flexibility. They are tech savvy and seek diverse groups. The speed and ease of the Internet  and its subsequent vast knowledge base, has led the ‘Net Generation’ of Y and Xer’s to be flexible and changing in its consciousness and with how it is communicated. We can see how this is in great contrast to the current environment of the risk averse, staid and steady world of the nonprofit.

However, we have seen some break-outs in the industry, nonprofits that have jumped the fence to do things differently, and with great results. For these nonprofits, we see that Innovation provides bold, new approaches to the way they work; they have decidedly replicated and integrated what can be learned from other disciplines; and they have provided ideas and strategies to our industry on how organizations can better foster new ideas and solutions to challenges and mission need.

Which is just the type of culture required to manage through such a massive shift in leadership, that is pending in our industry in the coming years.

What is needed for your organization to jump the fence into a culture of Innovation and to stand apart and excel in the approaching change?

Here are some simple and manageable ideas to get started.

1) Create and/or Embrace Your Constraints:

An excellent line from Marnie Webb, CEO of TechSoup Global, reflects “Innovation happens when people work within constraints — in an environment of not enough — and they figure out how to do it anyway.”  (Webb, 2011).   Well, doesn’t that just describe the EVER PRESENT environment of most, if not all, nonprofit organizations? So lack of resources, lack of time, lack of experience is a benefit and not a detriment to your Innovation.

Inspire a spirit of can do in your team: Teach them to routinely say to the world, “I know you said we can’t do this, but we are  going to figure a way that we can.”  A fun way to do this is to challenge your staff each month with one new problem to solve. It can be simple or complex, but make sure there are no single ‘right’ answers expected, and that all respondents get an encouraging word about their creativity in designing a solution. Take a look at the monthly responses and find one or two things that can be implemented from each, to make this activity actionable and inspiring.

2) Data is fuel for Innovation:

Research has had its day recently in the public square of discussion among the nonprofit set. It wasn’t until this recent decade though, that many nonprofits began to wake up to the fact that data drives exceptional performance. Metrics on outcomes of service and mission performance, as required now by grantors; benchmarks on philanthropy, collected and aggregated to drive decisions on fundraising expenditures; demographics on constituency that support political advocacy and marketing investments – all data driven for enhanced results.

Data drives Innovation as well.  How many experiments do you have currently going in your organization? What are you currently testing? If the answer is nothing, the future may look bleak for you. Testing gives you all the raw data you need to begin to get creative and innovate existing projects and services. Without it, you’re shooting in the dark.

It doesn’t matter where you start, as long as you start. Test something every week, every month and have a few tests going at the same time. Overall, testing does not significantly impact resources devoted to your project: You’re already completing the project with all the resources you have and need. Testing requires a simple tracking methodology.

A simple trial test, to get yourself and your staff acquainted with a culture of testing, is to develop a survey used with every donor/donation received. The survey can ask some common demographic questions, but also some quirky ones:  What color would you paint your car if you could paint it any color? What did you want to be when you grew up? What’s your favorite treat food?

The resulting data can be a rich playground for your team to get creative. What if more than 75% of your donors said Popcorn was their favorite treat food? How could you use this information to better your appeals, raise more money, sign up more volunteers, get more people to your programs? You could also take that quirky data, create an info-graphic and share with your constituency, giving them all an intimate look at the tribe they are part of in supporting your mission!

3) Free Access, Embrace Risk:

Let your staff play. Open up their access to the internet, create an environment of walking around to work, withhold judgement, encourage impossible dreams, create shared spaces for interaction. Let go of your organizational fear, and strict fence posts, and let your staff bloom! Additionally, inspire and ask you constituents and donor base to get involved. Create spaces for shared ideas, allow your donors to see their own giving histories, to watch projects unfold and to openly track progress of service delivery and program development.  Yes, even the warts and the odd parts.

Try this for one month: Using a cloud based program, like Dropbox or Google+, create a shared folder or a group for idea generation. Invite staff, board, donors, clients, to get involved. Post a problem or question of the month. Then encourage everyone to drop a comment. People love to give their feedback, so encourage that sharing on your real issues. Why not start with this question: What one thing would you change about us? Interact with the group, asking further questions, exploring responses, challenging perceptions.

4) Allow process, iteration, pivoting. Don’t kill the messenger or the message – massage it.

If you don’t give Innovation the time and attention it deserves, it will not produce and it will not gel as a culture. There are no bad ideas, only ideas which have not matured yet. Like a fine wine, an idea becomes innovative after taking some time to develop. Too often we rush to judgement on a solution, concept or strategy. Keep all ideas generative and don’t lose any along the way. Pop them open every so often, encourage follow through and push back on development on those that look promising or have some immediate potential application. Use data to tweak them along the way and send them out for more testing. Turn them over, look at them differently.  One of my favorite examples of this is asking the question: How is your_____________  like a ________? For instance, “How is your Nonprofit, like a Toaster?”.

5) Be sincere

Finally, don’t offer lip service on Innovation. It knows when you are lying and it knows when you are passionate about serving it well. Innovation is not a tactic, or a business management style. It is truly a culture, one which can only come from authentic, inspired and patient nurturing. Making it part of the spirit of your organization will yield powerful results.

Boss-man

In Random on July 27, 2012 at 10:44 am

Recently, I had the unfortunate opportunity to sit in the presence of a supervisor from my past, for an extended period, and listen to him speak. I was struck once again, even after so many years, of what an awful leader he was and obviously still is.

Then, this post this morning on twitter got me thinking about leadership in the nonprofit sector. 

Image

 

I’d give attribute for the picture, but there was none provided.

I was originally going to post today about innovation, and still will this week, but I think going back to basics about leadership is critical for any innovative approach to work.

So here is the translation of the above list for the nonprofit sector:

If you are leading your fundraising staff or a nonprofit team, then by definition you are-

  1. Coaching employees: Providing them with opportunities to fail, to learn, to gain insight and to achieve.What I mean is: To fail is to learn. To learn is to gain insight. And by gaining insight your staff ultimately achieves. What not to do? If you want to be a BOSS and not a LEADER, then say “no” often, chastise and punish for failures, limit projects, micromanage, get in the way, direct often, maintain an air of criticism when things don’t go well and show distrust in their efforts.
  2. Building goodwill among your team: You are authorized to lead. You are not authorized to dictate. A good LEADER will build authentic camaraderie based on respect, admiration of skills and honesty. From this will flow goodwill. Building goodwill, while for those not comfortable with leadership may sound superfluous, is at the core of every well run and successful nonprofit organization. Goodwill is contagious, it inspires others to do well for others and to help each other in a supportive environment. You can always tell an organization that depends on authority and has bankrupted goodwill – no one is safe from backstabbing.
  3. Generating enthusiasm:   Fear. ::shudder:: Fear shuts people down. It causes people not to think, to become myopic and to distrust everyone and everything. It places stress on the nervous system and creates negative filters. Fear kills. And most certainly it brings fundraising to a screeching halt. Building fear in your staff may bring you the perception of respect, but it will not help you reach your goals. Alternatively, being a cheerleader, generating enthusiasm for the work you do, for the mission of your organization and for the opportunity to serve the community, elevates peoples spirits, spreads joy. Think about those who speak highly of a LEADER (not a BOSS) and you will hear words such as: spirited, supportive, honest, good-natured, humble, encouraging and fun!
  4. Saying “We” and not “I”: In an industry driven by data – number of donors, number of gifts, cost ratios, number of prospects, number of visits… saying “we” can feel risky. How will I be judged for my performance if I cannot ‘count’ my numbers? Your staff will only conspire to share the wealth of achievement if you model such behavior. Authentically identifying when a group effort has achieved a goal or supported progress is the most important way to break down silo’s. BOSS-men take credit for everything good and demand accountability from others for everything bad. Horrible Bosses do so with impunity.To address the personal performance issue for your management of staff, I always suggest to my clients they follow this rule: Praise all publicly, assess privately.
  5. Focus on solutions not blame: Throwing around blame reminds me of monkeys in a cage, flinging……..well you get the picture. See number one in this list and realize that blame inhibits good coaching interactions, which instills rigidity and fear and will eventually break down any fundraising effort. Innovation cannot exist in a blame filled environment. Skip the poo flinging and get your team focused quickly on the resolution.
  6. Lead by example: Sometimes, just sometimes, I question whether leaders in the NPO sector actually ever did any fundraising at all? Too many times, I find that leaders are really, really good at A) stating what they read about fundraising or B) demanding some crazy concept they derived as effective -most often based in myth and not reality or research. Good LEADERS learn the craft and then teach the craft through interaction, experience and modeling behavior.
  7. Develop people, don’t ‘use’ them: We all met this person in junior high school. Eddie Haskell, looking for favor to gain his own ends. That guy (or gal) who is transparently disingenuous and only calls upon you when they need something. Or worse, the BOSS  who places you between himself and a bad outcome. Invest your time in developing relationships with your staff, learn about their personal lives, their likes, their dreams, their fears. Don’t be afraid if they don’t match yours. And don’t be judgmental. CARE about people (Create an Authentic and Respectful Environment).
  8. Gives Credit: I have been on the receiving end of a BOSS who speaks at a podium, taking credit for all the hard work I and my team have accomplished in reaching a lauded outcome. I have also watched as a BOSS does the same to others. The funny thing is, the BOSS looks like an ass each time. Because the dirty little secret is- everyone knows who did the work. Everyone already knows who gets the credit. Don’t be that BOSS, unless looking like an ass is a personal goal. Giving credit is easy, and contrary to how BOSS-men think, giving credit takes nothing away from you. In fact giving credit gives credit to your leadership. Because, as we see in the previous seven points in this list, your leadership inspires great things from your team.
  9. Asks: I am going to unapologetic here when I say “Ask your staff if they can perform a duty, do not tell them to.” The measure of your success as a LEADER will be in their answer. Good leadership inspires people to say some form of yes 99% of the time – “Yes, right now” or “Yes, shortly”  or “Yes” with adjustments. But they will want to say yes, because, they want to be a part of this team, they want to lead, they want to perform, they want to please others, they want to excel, they want to work. If you still are hesitant about asking, then you probably have guilt about your leadership style. Change your dance steps and the people you lead will change theirs.
  10. Saying “Let’s Go!”: I think playing on a team sport during your formative years should be mandatory. Nothing inspires and teaches good leadership like a good sports coach. Or the military. Team is unified, it is collective, it is cellular in nature. It is not independent entities working as one. It is one entity working independently. The core of the team is we. The battle cry is “Let US go”! For your fundraising team, how often do you expect the directors to go around the board table and report on “their” area? Try this instead: before every staff meeting, have each director interview one other to determine how that area’s projects are doing? Ask them to focus their questions on primary data capture: how many mailings, what was the return, etc. Then request they ask followup questions such as “How could I help you in this project?”, “How can we as a team support the effort?” and “What did we do that lent to the outcomes?”. Then at your staff meeting, the interviewer gives the report on the project. Watch the dynamic change.

I am a firm believer that everything which happens in our lives has purpose. For me it was at one time being supervised by this BOSS, and then getting to see him in action again. It helped me realize that LEADERSHIP is more than being a big person at the top. It’s about being that BIG person that brings others to the top. Thanks for that.

 

 

27.1 million golf players ….. and you without a tournament?

In Retail ideas, strategic planning on June 16, 2011 at 9:17 am

Golf is in the air.  TPC, US Open and your local favorite charity.

Golf has become big business for nonprofits.  At one time,  I lead my staff through more than forty-two… 42! …annual fundraising golf tournaments. Most were third party events, lead by dedicated- borderline maniacal- golf enthusiasts.

People take their golf very seriously. According to the National Golf Foundation’s 2010 golf participation study, there were 27.1 million golfers in the U.S. in 2009, where they played 486.2 million rounds of golf, at over 15,890 golf facilities. According to a report by SRI International for GOLF 20/20, the total size of the U.S. golf economy in 2005 was just under $70 billion, not including equipment and related purchases.

Those are some serious numbers.

Which is why charities should take their golf seriously too. 

If you haven’t already, consider developing and leading a strategic golf initiative at your organization. Gather the expert, and not so expert, enthusiasts within your volunteer ranks and task them with developing a vision, a charge and a strategy for incorporating more golf into your revenue stream. Ask them to focus on making this effort turnkey or low cost/high return. Your empowered base of greens-walkers will be instrumental in designing a program that captures some of the lucrative trends in the industry. Be certain your plan contains a method of resourcing the effort as well.

The success outcomes from this approach?

  • Expanded volunteer and donor base
  • Reliable new revenue stream
  • Substantial increase in community buzz
  • New executive and corporate relationships
  • Broad dissemination of your mission and programs
Here are some helpful websites to get you “on course”  (lol, you didn’t think I could go a whole post without an awful pun, did you!)
GolfLink: A database of golf tournaments

GolfRegistrations.com: This site has valuable freebies to help you get started on your own tournament

 

Capital Campaigns as Transformative Projects

In capital campaign, consulting, executive coaching, strategic planning on May 31, 2011 at 4:31 pm

Capital Campaigns are incredible projects – consuming of immense amounts of resources, but the returns of which can be transformative for your organization.

Capital Campaigns are important strategies to include in your organizations long term philanthropy development plans. Campaigns that are integrated (including all of the organizations’ stakeholders in its design and implementation);  unified (with the goal of raising campaign funds as well as enhancing and improving annual and other donations); and are strategically designed, have the power to change the level and quality of your fundraising forever.

Campaigns have a history of being synonymous with specialized one time fundraising, while the reality is that most organizations today operate campaigns on a regular basis, completing one as they are planning and launching another.  Such is the need for large capital project development for any nonprofit organization, whether you be hospital, school, church or social service. The good news is that this has changed the culture of philanthropy for your donor base. They are more attuned to the segmentation of capital needs vs operating needs for programs and service delivery. And many major donors are considering the next campaign project for your organization, as they prepare their own giving strategy.

Preparing for your capital campaign begins with a feasibility study, six to twelve months before you host your first campaign meeting of volunteers.

Studying What is Feasible

A feasibility study is a specialized process in which analysis is conducted on your organizations ability, capacity and capabilities to successfully operate a capital campaign. Studies show a 92 percent success rate for campaigns preceded by feasibility/planning studies.  A study is traditionally facilitated by a consulting group, such as Harvest Development Group. Through experience with other studies, as well as by providing third party anonymity to study participants, more accurate data is collected and assessed when a feasibility study is lead by a consulting firm, resulting in better decisions in the construction and launch of your campaign. Results of the feasibility study are developed and presented in a report that outlines not only your organizations internal ability to operate a campaign (human resources, data collection tools,  organizational capability to devote time and money to a campaign), but also to the external capacity for campaign success.

How is a Campaign’s Financial Goal Set?

The financial goal of your campaign cannot be determined without a study. Your campaign goal is not how much you need, but by how much you can be forecasted to raise. Taking a measurement of past giving history, donor statistics, environmental issues impacting your efforts, as well as time and human resources available, your feasibility study consultant will project a range in which you can rely on campaign funding, if all activities are implemented as directed. This range is a more realistic and reliable goal than using the cost of your project as a campaign goal. In many cases the goal revealed through your feasibility study will be sent back to your project planning and/or finance committee for consideration, as it will affect the projects scope and funding plans. Without a study to determine how much can be raised, it would be folly to start out a campaign, fundraising to reach an artificial and unknown amount. Worse is to ignore the feasibility study determination and set an artificially increased goal. No organization can benefit from falling short financially on a capital campaign, it does more harm than any of the good from the effort.

Who Do We Ask?

Another outcome from your feasibility study is analysis of your current and potential donor base to the campaign. A well facilitated study will determine best prospects, range of gifts (as a gift chart) and the number of gifts required, and a categorized donor base for consideration. Imagine an infographic outlining who to ask, how much to ask for and when to make the ask. With this information you can confidently move into planning and implementation with a visualization of how you can be successful.

Planning for your Campaign

After your feasibility study is completed, your organization has to take the next step- planning for, launching and operating your campaign. Feasibility studies are time sensitive, because it deals with dynamic data. The data revealed and used for results in your feasibility study has an expiration date, like milk. Waiting too long after a feasibility study is completed for your campaign to begin, can be detrimental to your campaign.  Sometimes waiting too long to launch after a study is completed  results in money being left on the table, because the information used has changed drastically for the better.  It would be horrible to ask a donor for an amount that is too low, because the study was produced with information three years prior! Worse, and more common, is a campaign delayed resulting in missed goals due to donors leaving, other organizations in the community launching their own campaign, project costs increasing, etc. Ideally, study results are valid for about six to twelve months, but no longer. Be certain that your organization is ready to move forward when the feasibility study is completed.

As with the feasibility study, the planning, launching and implementation of your capital campaign benefits tremendously by bringing in counsel. Don’t try to save money in this area, as a good consulting firm will not only help you raise more money but save you money as well.

Develop our Volunteer Leaders

Your feasibility study will have delivered a list of potential volunteers for your campaign effort. Include these individuals in your campaign committees as well as your board. Begin to inspire, organize and engage your volunteer campaign members immediately after your feasibility study ends, while the experience of being interviewed and the buzz of the study is still fresh in their minds. Preparing your committees and drafting your plan will be a four month project at least, given the busyness and chaotic schedules of volunteers and competing organizational priorities.

Pieces of the Plan

Planning for your campaign requires attention to details in a broad area. Staffing is critical, and plans may need to be developed to increase staffing temporarily to assist with campaign or back office workloads. In addition, operational tools for managing the campaign will be essential- CRM software, Data management, material production, media and distribution lines for campaign materials. Financial forecasts should be developed in collaboration with finance, so everyone invested in the financial outcomes has a schedule of when the funds can be anticipated for use.  Internal policies and procedures for campaign implementation are to be developed as guiding and aligning instruments. Crafting a campaign case statement that is inspiring, informative and catalytic is an early planning activity. Additionally, prospect development and solicitation briefs and strategies set the foundation for your cultivation’s and asks. Good counsel will lead and facilitate all of this and more as you move toward your campaign launch date.

Campaigns Added Benefits

Although campaigns require a significant investment of time and resources – expect to spend about 20% of your campaign goal on the planning and implementation of your campaign- the return in campaign funding, future funding, increased donor base, increased visibility and internal enthusiasm and engagement for your mission is invaluable and well worth the investment. A well organized and operated campaign can change your organization for ever.

 

For further information or to speak about how a  campaign can help your organization reach new heights contact Harvest Development Group, LLC at   roots@harvestdevelopmentgrp.com    or    at    860-575-5132

SHIFT: Meeting Corporate Philanthropy Where It’s Headed- Key Behaviors in Successful Corporate Partnerships

In change management, Discussables, Research on May 9, 2011 at 12:34 pm

Key behaviors of successful NPO / Corporate partnerships

Continuing our series on Corporate Philanthropy, we take a look at what the key behaviors are that we see in  nonprofits who have developed partnerships that provide a strong, reliable and renewable revenue  stream?

1. They all have a Personal Relationship with the company leaders: As a personal investment, the requirement that we build meaningful dialogue and a unified voice in our efforts to identify opportunities for partnering is essential.  A relationship with our company partners is not a mail campaign.  It’s not a sponsorship pitch.  It is the same level of personalized cultivation applied to our individual major donors.

Getting to a partnership is a process. The flow from first connection (usually a gift of some sort) through partnership generally follows this route:  Transaction —–> Relationship—–> Information——> Partnership.   The relationship traditionally begins with a transaction of some sort: a sponsorship, a membership, a donation, a grant. Capturing the interests of the corporation and appropriately acknowledging and stewarding their generosity, a relationship is developed, where information is shared that further delineates the opportunities and shared values/goals of the two parties, which leads to a partnership.

It’s essential that you get comfortable with building personal relationships for funding or partnerships with your corporate donors. It’s crazy to even have to say that, but many fundraisers we have worked with are intimidated or lack dedication to the relationship building process.  Having a personal relationship with your corporate donors is the most important thing you can do to succeed.

2. Value proposition: Your Value Proposition is a definition of the key benefits you provide to the corporation, as a potential partner. Your client base, your donor market, your organizations core values, where do you operate, what is your brand, who do you influence?  These are value positions used to negotiate what is needed- cash, people, advocacy. Your Value Proposition is not what you do. Let me say that again: VALUE PROPOSITION does NOT equal WHAT YOU DO!

As evidenced in some of the past video and case examples, Nike and others did not partner with the chosen NPO’s because of what they did. What they did was important. And the outcomes were essential to the decision. But the value proposition of those organizations was the quantitative factors they bring to the table: who do they reach? who gives to them? where are they located? what community do they serve? What does their organization represent to the community?

Taking a value inventory will be critical. You can do this internally amongst your staff in a brainstorming session, or you can hire a facilitator to help in the process. Either way, having a very solid knowledge of  your value proposition is essential to successfully identifying and selling your organization to the right corporation for the right partnership.

3. Trust:  This is huge.  We think we know about trust, but in this sense we mean total and complete transparency, clear communication, and fulfillment. Trust is built slowly over time, as a friend recently reminded me. Its not an all or nothing position and it is only bestowed upon you or anyone incrementally with some consideration and time. It is also impermanent, it can change with the tide. Your organization must provide the framework within which that trust can be built with the corporation.  It may mean sharing challenges that you normally would not be compelled or comfortable in sharing about your programs and funding. If it knocks you out of the competition for the companies attention, so be it; better to have it done now, than after you have spent considerable time, resources and energy in building up the relationship. Trust also requires promises to be fulfilled. If you said you would do something with the funding, well you better have at it and show the results.  Things do happen that not goals off course or missed, but the frequent and candid communication you are engaged in, while building trust with your corporate partner, will have taken that into account.

4. Commitment: You know what they say- In breakfast, the chicken is involved, but the pig is committed.  Your commitment to long term strategies requires your organization to have a vision and a strategic direction. Commitment is not chasing the money; it is building on and resourcing the programs and services essential to your success. Nonprofits who have successful corporate partnerships have mission strategies that are imbedded in their DNA, they are clear and concise and tactical. They are committed to the outcomes, no matter what.

Following these four foundational behaviors will position your organization to be prepared for a myriad of corporate funding partnerships that provide long lasting benefits and outcomes.

NEXT POST: Developing a plan for your own corporate partnership program.

SHIFT: Meeting Corporate Philanthropy Where It’s Headed- Corporate Goals in Philanthropy

In change management, Discussables, Research on May 2, 2011 at 10:44 am

What do Companies want from their Corporate Giving?

While a market presence and position is always a number one consideration for business, as they play out their social responsibility in the community, it isn’t necessarily the only factor behind their engagement. It’s important we are aware and respectful of all the driving interests, if we are to develop winning corporate partnerships.

Business benefits top the chart of priorities –

McKinsey & Company, a 75 year old management consulting firm which serves over 70% of the Fortune 500 companies listed today, surveyed 721 executives around the world—74 percent of them CEOs or other C-level executives, about corporate social responsibility. You can find the complete report here.

In their survey, McKinsey found that the vast majority of companies surveyed—nearly 90 percent—seek business benefits, such as customer acquisition and product distribution, from their philanthropy programs.

And some 80 percent of respondents say finding new business opportunities should have at least some role in determining which philanthropic programs to fund, compared with only 14 percent who say finding new business opportunities should have no weight.

So, marketing drives philanthropic partnerships… well, not so fast.

While marketing is an important driver, it should not be the sole driver or lead the development of a partnership between you and the corporation you are seeking to join forces with, as doing so may leave your reputation in question and will certainly not do anything to enhance business benefits for the company. Todays consumers are savvy, much more so than ever in history. For the marketing line to work in corporate/nonprofit partnerships, the relationship with the cause has to make Sense, it has to have Value and be Comprehensive and it has to have a Meaningful Outcome. The cures for cancer that exist which have spawned an ever growing trend of “Pink Washing”, is evidence of the many partnerships that just DON’T make sense  and result in outcomes that are anything but positive and customer building:

Remember “Bucketgate” May 2010? This drew much criticism and debate when it launched around Mothers Day.  Poor KFC, while they thought the pink would bring them notoriety, they didn’t expect the kind they received. And while any press may be good press, this just didn’t make sense, in any remote fashion. And the consumer saw right through it.  Sadly, Susan G Komens’ judgement and incentives were questioned as well.

If business benefits are a leading factor in a company’s drive to develop NPO partnerships through their giving, and pink buckets of chicken are the anti-concept, what does a philanthropic/socially responsible partnership look like?  Take a look at what might be a plausible and valuable brand and marketing position, from Nike.  The Nike Foundation created the ‘Girl Effect’ with critical financial and intellectual contributions by the NoVo Foundation and Nike Inc. and in collaboration with key partners such as the United Nations Foundation and the Coalition for Adolescent Girls. Here is their introductory video. What business benefits might they be seeking in support of this cause? What new business opportunities are they building? How does this make sense?

Not to be a KFC basher (I’ve eaten my share of chicken), but do we see the difference? This program does not appear to have the ‘slap it on a bucket’ approach of KFC. This philanthropic/socially responsible partnership ensures that market is not the key driver, but an integrated aspect of the partnership Nike has developed.

Local Impact is a close second in priorities for driving decisions on philanthropy

Executives overall say their companies are much likelier to address a broad mix of local issues with their corporate philanthropy programs than to address the social and political issues that they expect will affect shareholder value the most. In addition, interviews conducted suggest that companies see addressing local community needs as an indirect way to highlight a company’s good intentions to groups such as board members, shareholders, and regulators.

Chase Community Giving is an excellent example of a corporate giving program that was developed to have local impact. And in an interesting twist, Chase has combined their local perspective with crowd-sourcing: allowing the community to choose the charities which Chase will support.  By having the community vote on their charity of choice. Chase is empowering their community to lead their philanthropy. What is interesting about this, is that it make a case for and support the concept of, nonprofit accountability. If your NPO is not relevant in your community, if your community does not know about, care about or support your work….if you’re not doing good work and reaching meaningful outcomes- then you’re not a contender for Chase philanthropy. Their vetting process for impact is knitted into their philanthropy program.

Employee Base needs is the third critical goal of companies in their philanthropic giving –

Respondents in McKinsey’s survey most often cite employees as the stakeholder group important to the way companies think about their roles in society and as the group companies most often address with corporate philanthropy programs.

Employee satisfaction, retention, recruitment, all are critical business factors to corporations. By aligning their philanthropy with their employee base interests, they develop efficiencies in both lines. Often a company will have employee driven efforts, special programs which only employees can access for philanthropic engagement, pooled funds from employee activities, volunteer efforts devoted to employee outreach to the community and more directed at the interests and activities of employee groups.

A Recap –

The goals most often cited by corporations in their corporate giving strategies— 1. business benefits: enhancing brand, market reach; 2. working locally; and 3. building employee capabilities, improving employee recruitment and retention, all must be factored into the developed program you are building with your prospective corporate partner. If your program offers all three, its the trifecta of a corporate partnerhsip.

Who are the innovators?

Lets take a look at two award winners from the Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy’s Corporate Philanthropy Day 2010. As you watch this, try to capture as many of the goals and key outcomes we just discussed, in the programs these two innovators have developed.

Pretty comprehensive right? And I can guarantee these were not created in a marketing office, but were organically developed between the company body and the nonprofit they had the closest relationship with.

C.R.I.B. Notes

In Retail ideas, strategic planning on April 26, 2011 at 3:52 pm

C.R.I.B. Notes:

10 Steps critical to launching (or enhancing) a Comprehensive, Responsive, Integrated, Balanced fundraising program.

More frequently, nonprofits are taking a step back and evaluating their fundraising programs. Philanthropy has become an essential income line for nonprofit organizations. No longer is it looked upon as an “Oh, and we have fundraising, whatever it brings in I hope it’s a lot” approach. Now, in response to recent economic influences and increased competition for donor’s attention, it is considered part of a critical and required stream of sustainable funding.

Sustainable funding is a concept widely demanded by donors, grantors and program evaluators. It is a measurable and indispensable part of your nonprofits business practice. But how to go about establishing a viable and sustainable fundraising program?

For a fundraising program to be sustainable it must be comprehensively designed, integrated throughout the nonprofit organizations strategy and work plan, responsive to donor and program needs and balanced to ensure its smooth transition through the many economic and societal impacts the organization will face in its lifetime.

Here are ten fundamental steps that must occur, which if performed successfully, will position your fundraising to be Comprehensive, Responsive, Integrated and Balanced.

  1. Review your organizations Mission/Vision: Why do you exist? What are you seeking to do and who else is doing it as well? Audit the communities’ needs and what other providers of service to those needs exist. Are others doing exactly what you are doing? Successfully? With funding? If you stand out alone in your field, congratulations! If not, but you can justifiably compete, consider collaborating. If you cannot justifiably compete, then consider amending or abandoning your mission focus.
  2. Determine your organizations Value Proposition: What real, fundamental and measureable value impact does your organization have on the community it serves? Your true value must be determined by evidenced based outcomes that you can point to in support of your organizations reason for being. People will not fund what you do, but they will flock to you if you can prove, with results, what changes you bring about that either affect their lives or align with their values. It can be as simple as ‘We lighten the spirits of 5,000 urban and suburban symphony members every year from May through October’; or as complex as ‘We reduced crime 34% in the last 18 months through our youth crime prevention mentoring initiative’. Either way, it will require some work on your part, to consistently and accurately determine your programs valuable achievements.
  3. Establish a financial forecast for your fundraising: Why do you need this money and what are you going to do with it? How much is needed and why that specific amount? Your donors will want this information to be valid, reasonable and transparent, if they are going to trust their investment with your organization and buy in to your ability to be successful in your efforts. No trust, no funding.
  4. Audit and Assess your prospective donor pool and determine your viability in fundraising and your financial capacity: Where will you be pulling your donors from? Internally? Externally? Warm prospects? Cold lists? Individuals? Corporations? Foundations? How much can convincingly be raised from these prospective donor pools? And how long will it take you to move your donors to achieve this amount of funding? Does the amount of money you can project to reasonably raise meet your needs, as outlined above? If not how will you fill the gap? Your board, not to mention your donors, will not want to fund a program set to fail because of poor long term financial planning. Have your ducks lined up and know how your money is going to come in, how much and from whom and how long to achieve your goal.
  5. Develop a budget for your fundraising program: Raising money is a product generating and performance enhancing business practice, which requires a budget for expenditures in its implementation. Set your organizations mind right, by building a budget that will be sufficient to generate the returns you have determined you can achieve.
  6. Establish and follow Performance Metrics: Tangible, measurable, meaningful metrics on your fundraising program, will provide feedback in the short term for iterating your fundraising plan. Iteration is an important part of your plan and should be built into your strategy. The term and technical process of iteration is stolen from the Tech world, but it is a wildly successful and highly focused tool for making significant and donor centric improvements to your fundraising plan over short term intervals. Responsiveness will increase your fundability. Over the long term, performance metrics will validate your efforts to your donors, your clients and your leadership and set a foundation for additional growth.
  7. Develop your case for support: Assess your organizations service programs, your fundraising goals, your measurements as above and your donor prospects. Tell your donors through the development of your Case Statement, specifically why funding you is an excellent investment, what programs will be supported, what outcomes will be achieved, how you will achieve them, by when and by whom.
  8. Get your papers in order: Review your By-Laws. Ensure your organization is set up to fundraise. Consult with your financial advisor and your attorney to validate your organizations filing status with the state or states you are fundraising in. Avoid costly legal and financial miss-steps before they occur.
  9. Organize your interactions: Invest in a Donor Relationship Management database early on, before you launch your new or newly expanded fundraising program. Building on your success and establishing a long term trusting relationship with your donors is the most significant strengthening exercise to your sustainability. This cannot be done without a tool to accurately and confidently track your relationships. Don’t skimp on this one. Luckily, there are many software programs that are no or low cost to qualified nonprofit organizations.

10. Assemble and engage your key stakeholders: Administrative leadership, board, employees- these are not only your first donor set, but your strongest and most important partners in your sustainable fundraising program. Empower them and make them apostles of the fundraising plan. With the first nine steps in place, their confidence will be raised and their enthusiasm to lead the effort will be the natural response.

SHIFT: Meeting Corporate Philanthropy Where It’s Headed- Corporate Social Responsibility

In change management, Discussables, Research on April 25, 2011 at 2:31 pm

What is Corporate Social Responsibility?

And more importantly, why is it an important part of our conversation in discussing our relationship with corporate partners in philanthropy?

The reality is that Corporate Social Responsibility is an emerging field. It is a very broad and evolving area of development for corporations and not for profits alike, a new terrain for which maps are much needed, but often are imprecise.

It has a complexity that is only seen in the emergence of new ideas and systems , a nucleus of thoughts, practices and evidenced based studies that are lending to the defining structure that it is becoming, following along the lines of chaos theory.   To a corporation, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)  has a multitude of components, too many to review in this one small post.  Its concept and its practice is complex,  often disjointed and, currently, most often reactive.  Divergent views and information overload is nowhere more apparent than in the field of corporate social responsibility. Each company is different, each with its own challenges, corporate culture, unique set of stakeholders and management systems. Each with its own view and opinion and strategy.

But amid this swirling pool of CSR anti-matter, certain agreed upon norms and standards are being established. The World Business Council on Sustainable Development makes this statement on defining Corporate Social Responsibility:

Corporate Social Responsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as of the local community and society at large

And this from an MBA textbook on defining corporate social responsibility:

Corporate Social Responsibility  is the decision-making and implementation process that guides all company activities in the protection and promotion of international human rights, labor and environmental standards and compliance with legal requirements within its operations and in its relations to the societies and communities where it operates. (Lehigh University, College of Business and Economics)

Two very nearly similar definitions. We are getting close to a commonality of expected beliefs and outcomes, among everyone involved in defining CSR.

Despite its complexity most corporations practicing a CSR culture, administer and measure their CSR programs along these three areas:

External Business Practices: How the corporation does business.  Who they compete with, who they partner with, their supply chain, their products, their distribution lines  and the impact their business has on society.

Internal Business Practices: Their corporate governance, their corporate policies, investments, ethical balance structure and the impact their business has on their employees

Impact Partnerships:  How they respond to societal issues that specifically impact their business practices, both internal and external and who they partner with in doing so.

Secondly, most corporations will agree that the measurement of these are based on three bottom lines:  Financial bottom line outcomes, Environmental bottom line outcomes and Social bottom line outcomes. This is called the triple bottom line.

Defining 3BL

For our role, as nonprofits seeking to shift our approach in securing corporate funding, it is essential to know and understand the core concept, terms and definitions on CSR as outlined here. Our ability to engage in an educated dialogue about our partners corporate social responsibility is critical to our successfully defining a partnership that meets both our and their needs.

CSR HISTORY

Let me take you through a quick history on corporate social responsibility. Some may think it’s a new idea, a fad or a recent breakthrough in thinking. But it goes as far back as the late 1800’s. Evidence of corporate socially responsible practices among industrialized corporations can be found in some of our most familiar company names. For instance, take the Sears Roebuck Company, a company that was near bankruptcy when Julius Rosenwald, joined the company in 1895.

During his tenure as vice president, treasurer and then president, Rosenwald grew the company from a failing $750,000 a year corporation to over $50 million.  As part of his growth plan, Rosenwald invested a lot of Sears’ money into society, specifically agriculture. Rosenwald understood that the growth of Sears Roebuck was wholey dependent on the growth and wellbeing of the company’s customer- the American Farmer and its field hands. And so he invested in his company by investing in his customer, through their societal, educational and family needs.

Why Rosenwald did this was not ‘termed’ corporate social responsibility until 1953 with the publication of  the book ‘Social Responsibility of Businessmen’ by economist and college president Howard R. Bowen.

But still the term languished, without much fanfare for about a decade, until the phrase was reinvigorated in the 60’s and 70’s around the time when big international companies faced anti-corporate sentiments because of environmental and human rights issues. In fact, companies faced large scale boycotts of their goods and services to force change among corporate practices affecting society and the environment.

Through the 80’s discussion of the concept of CSR grew. During that time, most socially responsible behavior was positioned as a philanthropic activity based on a company’s fixed budget that was allocated to support nonprofit organizations – mostly doing so to “look good”. These funds were sometimes allocated to many organizations  with the idea that to satisfy as many interest groups and to gain as much visibility as possible was a beneficial goal. The commitment was usually short term and restricted to making donations that were heavily influenced by the wishes of the senior management of the organization, and mostly to bring about a marketing position through brand awareness at nonprofit events.

Then in 1989, Ben and Jerry’s distributed the first ever Social Responsibility Annual Report. People took notice, because it authentically calculated Ben and Jerry’s  business practices and policies that lead to meaningful outcomes for society and the environment and to bottom line financial benefits to the company and the communities it supported.

Academic exploration, corporate research and charitable interest in CSR began to escalate at a rapid rate. In 1992 the Earth Summit in Rio was a key moment in the evolution of CSR. At this Summit, it was reported that “the level of corporate involvement in the summit was unprecedented, unlike anything ever seen before, with a coalition of 48 companies coming together to establish a new coalition, the Business Council for Sustainable Development (BCSD)”. This coalition placed the academic and financial exploration of  CSR culture on the map in a way now other group or company had been able to do before. The BCSD would later become the World Business Council on Sustainable Development (WBCSD) which continues to be an authority in CSR and have tremendous influence on the corporate social responsibility stage.

Since that time, corporate social responsibility as an essential and important business practice has moved from discussion in the cubicles of most corporations, to a presence in the board room and a position on the balance sheet of almost all company’s large and small.